A visit to the Ffynone Waterfall in Pembrokeshire

by Jan

Ffynone Waterfall is a hidden gem in South West Wales.  The waterfall is on the Dulas River which leads into an unspoilt valley in the woods.  Set in a stunning landscape of waterways and ancient woodland, Ffynone Waterfall is perfect for some escapism, or a serene nature walk.

You’ll find the Ffynone Falls in a secluded area of the Cwm Cych valley, which straddles the border between Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire.

It is also extremely close to Cardigan in Ceredigion, so we made a visit to the Ffynone Falls during our recent stay in Aberporth.

How to get to Ffynone Waterfall

Ffynone Waterfall is near Newcastle in Boncarth.  It is only 7 miles south of Cardigan, so ideal for a scenic walk if you are staying near here.  There are two car parks about one mile from the falls.  If you are coming from the B4332 the main car park is on your right.

The postcode for the car park at the Ffynone Waterfall is SA37 0HQ.

The walk to Ffynone Waterfall

Ffynone Falls Map, Permbrokeshire, Wales, UK

From the back of this car park, you’ll see a footpath which runs alongside the river.  It is flat and accessible and takes about 20 minutes to walk to the waterfall.  Don’t be confused by the weir which you will pass shortly into your walk.

When you get to the fork in the path by the little house, go straight ahead.  This will lead directly to Ffynone Waterfall.

Ffynone Waterfall

open swimming at Ffynone Falls, Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

Ffynone is a very natural beauty spot, in a secluded valley.  We went on a rainy day and almost had the place to ourselves.

There’s a bench to sit and enjoy the solitude, or you can take wellies for a paddle in the water.  The water is exceptionally clear and suitable for open water swimming, but the pool area is not particularly large.

The area around the waterfall is very natural and completely uncommercialised.  Don’t expect to find any facilities, just a stunning landscape.

In fact, it is so spectacular that it’s reputed to be a portal to the otherworld, AnnwnAnnwn was mentioned in the book of Mabinogion, a collection of mythological stories from early Welsh literature.

Trees by Ffynone Falls, Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

Ffynone Woods

Walking back behind the Ffynone falls, Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

Those that are more adventurous can scramble up the valley sides over the tree roots to the top.  It’s a bit muddy and slippery but provides a great vantage point for a bird’s eye view of the falls.

From here, you can then follow the flow of the water through the Ffynone Woods.  For me this was the best part of the walk.

We discovered several more cascades and some white-water rapids.  This extended walk took us through ancient woodland, where the moss-covered trees line the valley sides.

Covering an area of 325 acres, the Ffynone Woods once belonged to the Ffynone Estate.  The woodland is now a conserved area (SAC) and an area of Special Scientific Interest (SSI).

Woodland at Ffynone Falls, Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

Practical information for your visit

views of Ffynone Falls, Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

Parking near the Ffynone Waterfall is free.  It is dog friendly and child friendly walk.

There are no facilities at all at the falls, but there is an 18th Century Welsh pub, the Ffynnone Arms, just a short drive away.

Other things to do near the Ffynone Waterfall

If you like waterfalls, you could visit the nearby Cenarth Falls for a walk.  Alternatively head to Cilgerran and visit the The Welsh Wildlife Centre and Cilgerran Castle.

You could also visit the local beaches for some fantastic coastal walks.  Ffynone Waterfall is not far from the vast Poppit Sands, or the magnificent Mwnt Beach.  You could even find another waterfall at Tresaith Beach.

Click here for a full guide to things to do near Cardigan.

Have you walked to the Ffynone Waterfall?  We’d love to hear your comments below.

Pin for later:  A visit to the Ffynone Waterfall, Pembrokeshire

A visit to the Ffynone Waterfall, Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK

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